Catch-up

Not the red gooey stuff. The sort that happens on NY day, for example. Or, while benched by the latest physical issues. This month’s special is the ITBand Syndrome. It all came about, I surmise, by gleefully riding my bike a bit too fast and a bit too far, without working up to it. I’m no biker. But, I love the wind in my face, and I love to go “Fast.” Meaning, faster than I can walk, I suppose at this time in my life, post-multiple-issues.

Nobody tells you that aging involves modifying your swing.

Or maybe they do, but I wasn’t listening, having subconsciously taken the “exclusion” clause.

Having found my WORDPRESS sign -n credentials, I hope to write more frequently than once every two years. We’ll see. I’m looking forward to exploring the new WP features.

While benched, I’ve created a flames-themed fleece robe for our 9 year old grandson; knit three hats; sewn fleece hats and masks -I cannot tally them! Been watercolor painting, sorting old files (you know you are getting desperate when sorting sets in); and launched this pretty website: https://joanoconnell.photoshelter.com. “

Cheers, friends!

Change floods

Noticing the garage door was open, the grill poised for action at the top of the driveway, I parked the car in front of the house, gathered my belongings and walked across the lawn toward my husband who was engaged in a phone call near the grill. We exchanged no words, but I got the picture. Here was an opportunity to engage in a nice little ritual we do: put the meat on the grill, then set up some chairs right there on the driveway and relax together, greeting the dog-walking neighbors as they stroll by.

I selected a chair from the garage, opened it, situated my pillows, grabbed a water, and plopped down expectantly.

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Teacher, have you noticed?

As Back-to-School assembles pencils, rulers and notebooks in store aisles, here are two stories from the inside about the impact of sensory and distractability issues (and boredom) in the school setting.

The student queries: to herself, of course.

Teacher. I’m just wondering.

  • Do you like to run your fingers along the wall when you are by yourself, on your way to the teacher’s lounge?Image result for free image of cinder block
  • Have you noticed how smooth and cool the paint is on the cinder blocks?

 

Teacher: Do you notice all the different kinds of clouds drifting by the windows in the science room?  Can you believe how blue the sky is today?  Doesn’t it make you wonder why we have to be indoors all day?

  • Have you tracked a lady bug’s progress on the windowsill during math class? I have.

I wonder about the bug and where she is going and why she is in our math class?  Will she survive the class change or will somebody squash her as they rush by?

Teacher, when you get to go down the hall all by yourself, don’t you just want to break into a bouncy celebration,  running full blast into that open space? 

 

–In the classroom, the lesson progressing:

The student, getting antsy, does some creative writing ~

My chair’s too short and the floor is all gritty under my shoes.

Sitting sideways in my seat, I watch winter boots’ salt drifting in the air, colliding with floating dust particles.

A nearby sneeze (“excuse me”) unsettles me into feet shuffling.

I love hearing the crunchy scraping sounds:  scrape…scratch…scrape.

“Esperanza.”

Oh, no.

Suddenly flushed with anxiety, I look around; I remember that I am in school. In your class, Teacher.  And, there you are, full stop, mid-lesson, your look boring into me.  I suspect your impatience.

I scramble to remember.  What did you and the principal and my mom decide that I should do or say in these moments?  I still haven’t answered you.

The kids are starting to turn toward their neighbor, exchanging snickers and discomfort at my expense.

Drat.  I really can’t remember what I’m supposed to do.  I am getting more upset; I can feel it.

Now I want to bolt out of here.

I am so embarrassed.

But I can’t think right now.

I am so confused.

What do I notice?

When do I notice ASD in me?

  • When I am not in charge
  • Motor planning
  • Sensory overload
  • Hyper-focus (concentrating)
  • Distractions
  • In a group of people (i.e., more than Joan plus one)
  • While attempting small talk
  • Trying to do anything requiring sequencing:

Trying to organize/order piles, files, clothing, dishes, etc.

Studying

Cleaning a room

Making dinner

How do I experience the ASD manifesting itself?

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There is a lot to learn

Seriously, we are very glad that you came by.

We are certainly still building this site!

A tid-bit for you: when I’m especially anxious and anticipate, based on experience, that I will be unlikely to “stay in my adult” when facing off with an emotionally-overwhelming situation, I arm myself with a soccer red card. Yes.   Image result for free usage image of soccer red card  And I use it!  With pre-educated individuals (the husband), I pull a red card when I need to say, “This conversation is over,” or “I need to leave now,” but cannot get my words together due to flooding.

 

Teacher tip:  did you get it?  Of course you did!  Thank you.

Please consider working out something similar with your students who flood easily, lose their words, duck their heads, hit the kid beside them when they cannot communicate.  Teach them how to cope with their confusing multi-firing neurological realities.  Gently and without shame:  Dear student, when you start to feel the floods rising, please raise the card and take a break.  I know I can trust you. : )